Batting Order Correlation App

DFS Baseball is also a stackable game. Unlike football, the agent in which players correlate isn't their position, but rather where they hit in their team's batting order. With favorable sequencing, single events stand to mutually benefit multiple players - we see this happen most frequently with RBIs and runs scored. This app helps to quantify the strength of correlation between teams batting order positions. A user might first begin by identifying a game they want to stack (maybe due to a favorable pitching matchup or game environment), then they can refer to this app to determine which players make for the most correlated (or perhaps negatively correlated employing a high-floor cash strategy) stacks.

App User Guide

App interface
  1. Site input: Select the site scoring scheme you want to compare batting order correlations across.
  2. Team input: Select the team(s) whose batting order correlations you want to compare.
  3. Data download button: This button allows you to download the app output to the right.
  4. Team(s) column: This column shows the team associated with each row. When comparing multiple teams, the app is defaulted to sort by team and batting order within each team. However, sorting on one of the batting order columns (5) will unsort the rows by team, so you will need to refer to this column to determine what team is associated with the batting order correlation rows. There is no team defaulted to show, input the team(s) whose batting order correlations you want to view to populate the app output to the right.
  5. Batting order columns & rows: These rows and columns are used to frame the correlation matrix of batting order positions. To find the correlation between a team's 2nd and 3rd hitters, read the value that appears at the intersection of the 2nd row and 3rd column or the 3rd row and the 2nd column (you'll notice that these values are equal). This value is indicated by (6).
  6. Batting order correlation value: If you're unfamiliar with correlations, I suggest reading this article which I think provides a good introductory summarization of correlation. Correlations range from -1 to +1. A correlation value of zero means that two batting order positions are completely uncorrelated. As correlations approach -1, we say that these two batting order positions are strongly negatively correlated - meaning that as one position performs well, the other tends to perform poorly. As correlations approach +1, we say that these two batting positions are strongly positively correlated - meaning that as one position performs better, the other tends to perform better as well. Conversely, as one performs worse, the other tends to perform worse as well.